Hibernating control cells or why inflammations become chronic

Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common autoimmune disease of the joints. It causes a chronic inflammatory response, with the body’s own immune cells attacking the joint, including the cartilage and bone. This process does not cease spontaneously. Medical researchers have now managed to identify an immune system cell type that can be used in a targeted attempt to control the inflammatory response in arthritis patients.

Rheumatoid arthritis risk and noxious airborne agents

New research indicates that certain occupations may put workers at an elevated risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. The findings suggest that work-related factors, such as noxious airborne agents, may contribute to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Environmental factors are thought to play a role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis by triggering autoimmune reactions in susceptible individuals.

Tuning out arthritis pain with radio energy

A noninvasive treatment for knee arthritis has been developed that uses cooled radio energy to target and interrupt pain signals.  Known as “Coolief,” the procedure can provide several months of relief from chronic arthritis pain for patients for whom surgery is not an option.